Jamie Moyer’s Secret to Success applied to your Chess Game

49 Year Old Jamie Moyer of the Colorado Rockies

  Last week 49 year old Jamie Moyer picked up a well earned win for the Colorado Rockies, the baseball team here.  My friend and super active chess player Dean Brown was there to watch it live.

   None of Moyer’s pitches was over 79 mph.
 
   Moyer has 268 wins over 27 years of playing in the majors.
 
   Baseball players are old when they hit 30. They are really old when they turn 35.
 
   Beyond that? Very few player can play past age 35. Moyer at 49 not only won a game, he’s pitched well the first 3 games this year, and some consider him the best pitcher on the team.
 
   Pretty amazing!
 
   How does he do it?
  • He’s smart. He doesn’t strike people out.
  • He gets them to hit the ball to his defense.
  • He doesn’t make avoidable mistakes (walking batters)

   Meanwhile Philip Humber of the Chicago White Sox pitched the 21st Perfect Game in Baseball’s 100+ year history.

   Once every 20,000+ games.
 
   How does this young guy make history?
  • He doesn’t make avoidable mistakes (walking players)
  • doesn’t try striking out the opposition.
  • He wants the batter to hit the ball to his guys. 

   He almost certainly won’t be pitching when he’s 40 but like Jamie Moyer he doesn’t make the careless, obvious, avoidable mistakes.

 
   A lot of times success is about what you DON’T DO and not what you do.

   In chess it is the same way.  You can win a lot of games just by not making the careless, obvious, avoidable mistakes.

   You don’t always have to try and overpower your opponent.  You don’t have to be flashy.  You don’t have to be overly clever.  Just be consistent, and try to make a good move on each turn.






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One thought on “Jamie Moyer’s Secret to Success applied to your Chess Game

  1. 1) You can win a lot of games just by not making the careless, obvious, avoidable mistakes.
    That is ABSOLUTELY true! The first sign of a STRONG player is not playing random moves. If you are making simple mistakes (blunders) you cannot say you are “good player”. It is especially true for people who hangs material before move 30 or 40. I do not mean losing material by defending from attack by our opponent, but simple dropping!

    2) Just be consistent, and try to make a good move on each turn.
    The most significant mark of STRONG player. Players above 2100 or 2200+ play chess very “straight” (equal). They do not make moves that hangs material even in 2-3 moves ahead. I can confirm that making good moves all the time is MUCH more difficult than it might seem “just play clear”.

    3) You don’t always have to try and overpower your opponent
    Be careful! This advice might be a bit misleading! When your opponent attacks you, than you HAVE to defend very stubbornly. Anyway – if your opponent has got an advantahe (no matter if material or positional), but he can break your position (fortress), you do not have to play “fast and strong” – just do not allow him to convert (or make larger) his advantage. I have tried this many times, and it works very well – no matter how strong the opponent.

    In conclusion:
    A lot of times success is about what you DON’T DO and not what you do.

    The first level of teaching chess is “don’t do A, B, C”, but the second is “you have to do E, F, G”. The third one is the most difficult “you have to work out what is yours and your opponent’s plan and react to that the proper way”.

    I bet next comparison will be to the NBA players :). I like that and I want to share my views as often as I can add something useful. Now I can say that 99% NBA players do not lose a ball without opponents’ pressure.

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